#76 Corn Cob Pipe & Button Nose & –do you remember the lyrics?

corn cob pipe & button nose

 


#76 Corn Cob Pipe & Button Nose
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& two eyes made out of coal.

Mer­ry Christmas!
Hap­py Hanukkah!
Hap­py Kwanzaa!
and for a few dear friends of mine…
Bah Hum­bug!


Frosty the Snowman

a corn cob pipe & a button nose & two eyes made out of coal”

I chose this frigid but fun lit­tle guy to wish all my Amper­Art friends a Hap­py Hol­i­day Sea­son. I don’t think Frosty has any reli­gious pref­er­ence — well, maybe he wor­ships the Ice Man.

For this Amper­Art piece I could­n’t quite remem­ber the lyrics — I just recalled “a corn cob pipe & a but­ton nose & some­thing some­thing some­thing”—so I pulled up the ani­mat­ed short that I’ve always heard about but nev­er seen: Frosty the Snow­man by Bass/​Raskin Pro­duc­tions (1969). I was delight­ed to hear one of my favorite voic­es nar­rat­ing the sto­ry — Jim­my Durante. (Paul Frees, the voice of Dis­ney’s Haunt­ed Man­sion Ghost Host, Lud­wig Von Drake, and Boris Bade­n­ov of Rocky & Bull­win­kle, is fea­tured as San­ta Claus himself.)

Here are the full lyrics:

Frosty the Snowman
Writ­ten by Jack Rollins and Steve Nelson
Orig­i­nal­ly sung by Gene Autry & The Cass Coun­ty Boys
Released Decem­ber 14, 1950

Frosty the snow­man was a jol­ly hap­py soul
With a corn­cob pipe & a but­ton nose
& two eyes made out of coal
Frosty the snow­man is a fairy­tale they say
He was made of snow but the children
know how he came to life one day
There must have been some mag­ic in that
old silk hat they found
For when they placed it on his head
he began to dance around

Oh
Frosty the snowman
was alive as he could be
& the chil­dren say he could laugh
& play just the same as you& me
Thumpi­ty thump thump
thumpi­ty thump thump
Look at Frosty go
Thumpi­ty thump thump
thumpi­ty thump thump
Over the hills of snow

Frosty the snow­man knew
the sun was hot that day
So he said
Let’s run &
we’ll have some fun
now before I melt away
Down to the village
with a broom­stick in his hand
Run­ning here & there all
around the square saying
Catch me if you can
He led them down the streets of town
right to the traf­fic cop
& he only paused a moment when
he heard him holler “Stop!”
For Frosty the snow man
had to hur­ry on his way
But he waved good­bye saying
Don’t you cry
I’ll be back again some day
thumpi­ty thump thump
thumpi­ty thump thump
Look at Frosty go
thumpi­ty thump thump
thumpi­ty thump thump
Over the hills of snow

If you want to watch the 1969 ani­mat­ed short, click on Frosty’s hat:

tophat

I wish all of you, my loy­al sub­scribers, vis­i­tors, and amper­sand fans around the world, a warm and won­der­ful hol­i­day season…
except for Frosty — a jol­ly freez­ing cold one for him & his corn cob pipe & but­ton nose.


 Note on design: 

I fre­quent­ly have the oppor­tu­ni­ty to apply my for­mu­la for “aha!” design, which is luck + tal­ent = damn good design. Take a look at the lyrics in Corn Cob Pipe & But­ton Nose. There is at least one “o” in each line! That gave me the idea to use Frosty’s body for each “o.” Though it appears there might be miss­ing or hid­den let­ters, they’re all there. We (Frosty & I) have just turned every “o” into a snowball.


 

Production notes for Corn Cob Pipe & Button Nose:
Original size: 20x30 inches
Program: Illustrator
Typographic styling: There are no letters missing or hidden by Frosty’s body. Each “O” is rendered as one of his snowballs.
Font: KB The End Is Broken
Ampersand: the finest wool, of course
Images for Corn Cob Pipe & Button Nose:
Snowflake background: psd​graph​ics​.com (hundreds of free hi-​rez images)
Top hat: cli​partbest​.com

Family & Friends & Ampersands…our greatest holiday gifts

Family & Friends includes my cats!


#75 Family & Friends
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First, to my own family & friends:

I love you, I appre­ci­ate you, I respect you,
I enjoy you, I thank you.
But most of all, I love you.


About this edition

I got the idea for Amper­Art #75, Fam­i­ly & Friends, fea­tur­ing our friend the fun & fab­u­lous amper­sand, about a month ago, after a friend & a fam­i­ly mem­ber came to my res­cue. More on that lat­er. (Thanks, Joe. Thanks, Roz.) 

Fam­i­ly & Friends is a very spe­cial Amper­Art title to me & hope­ful­ly to you. I went through sev­er­al iter­a­tions to bring you a mean­ing­ful, ele­gant piece that you might want to send to oth­ers with your own sen­ti­ments, or frame for your fam­i­ly room (or Fam­i­ly & Friends Room) wall. It was issued for Thanks­giv­ing 2014, but let’s face it, Fam­i­ly & Friends are timeless.

First, you’ll meet my own fam­i­ly & friends (includ­ing my pets, of course). I am blessed with a lov­ing fam­i­ly &  friends that are the very best. That includes you, too, my awe­some read­ers & sub­scribers — you’re my Amper­Art family!

Then, you’ll see how the Fam­i­ly & Friends edi­tion was cre­at­ed. In response to sev­er­al requests from sub­scribers who want to see how I cre­ate Amper­Art, or how I even choose a top­ic, I’ve explained the process in the next sec­tion. (This par­tic­u­lar Fam­i­ly & Friends piece posed sev­er­al chal­lenges even though the design is quite sim­ple. It’s a per­fect exam­ple of why each Amper­Art piece can take 20 hours or more.)


My own family & friends

I am blessed with a won­der­ful family:

Mom & Dad (both gone but always in my heart) — both of my par­ents are the def­i­n­i­tion of integrity.

My sis­ter Roslyn & my broth­ers Andy & Robyou are the epit­o­me of love, friend­ship, hon­esty and gen­eros­i­ty. You’ve always been there when your eccen­tric black sheep of a broth­er need­ed a help­ing hand or a hand-​out. Thank you.

Mary Ann, you helped me get my very first van so I could start my busi­ness. You took care of us kids when Mom near­ly died. And today you com­ment on every one of my Amper­Art pieces. You’re very spe­cial to me…cuz you’re my favorite cuz.

My friends are so plen­ti­ful there prob­a­bly aren’t enough giga­bytes on the serv­er to list them all, so I’ll men­tion the old­est and dear­est, in the order they came into my life: Gary R, Gary S, Joe R (we’re talk­ing ele­men­tary and junior high on those three), Lande WGregg & Jill, Mardy D, Deb­o­rah T, Lisa S (& lat­er Sean), Jim B (if it weren’t for him I’d still be design­ing with a T‑square), Mark H (& lat­er Crys­tal), Pat B, Tara K, Mar­ty K, Sandy J, Denis W, Jeanette F. Those who have depart­ed, whom I miss dear­ly: Gilbert (the one & only!), Joe F, Pre­ston H.

My fur­ry fam­i­ly: Tiger, Bull­dog, Don­ald (yes, a duck), Woofer (my very best friend for six­teen years), Bri­quette, Amos & Andy…and my cur­rent awe­some crea­tures, Jeep­ers & Bebe.

I feel like I’m at the podi­um for the Oscars! Well, you see, that’s what my fam­i­ly & friends do for me.

Now back to what inspired this piece: Last month I had a seri­ous cir­cum­stance, and between my best friend Joe Rin­au­do and my best sis­ter Roslyn (she’d be my best sis­ter, I’m sure, if I had a dozen but she too is the one & only) they did some­thing for me as a com­plete sur­prise, sav­ing me from being home­less for the sec­ond time in my life. Imme­di­ate­ly I thought of com­bin­ing “Fam­i­ly & Friends” into one piece of art — to me they are often one and the same. My broth­ers & many friends & even a few clients have also helped me in need — tremen­dous­ly. If I did­n’t have to get this sent out right now I’d tell you about those Fam­i­ly & Friends expe­ri­ences, too. Instead, I’ll come up with some new ideas to illus­trate those episodes in future editions.


How this project began…and wouldn’t end

This Fam­i­ly & Friends piece encoun­tered so many obsta­cles and mor­phed through so many changes I fig­ured it’s the per­fect exam­ple to explain how I cre­ate my Amper­Art pieces. Read More

#55 Returns & Exchanges

AmperArt-55-Returns-Exchanges

Click to view full-​size or download hi-​rez image for gallery-​quality printing and framing. 
This is a high-​resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

The day after Christ­mas must be as dread­ed to retail­ers as the day after Thanks­giv­ing is wel­come — you know, Black Fri­day, the biggest shop­ping day of the year.

Used to be, before online shop­ping & big box stores, all the depart­ment stores from Sears & Pen­neys (as it used to be called), to Saks & Nord­stroms, had a spe­cial win­dow or room all its own (with a classy, dis­creet sign) that han­dled returns, exchanges & com­plaints. Next to that was the gift wrap­ping ser­vice & lay­away department.

Remem­ber the smell of fresh pop­corn & can­dy when enter­ing your neigh­bor­hood Sears?

Today a cou­ple stores still offer a com­fort­able set­ting for such returns & exchanges (no can­dy or pop­corn, though), but the big box & deep dis­count chains most­ly just have a return counter (with a tacky “Line Starts Here” arrow hang­ing from the ceil­ing) and a  trail of cus­tomers (all “dressed up” in the lat­est Big Box fash­ion) that extends out the door.

So Decem­ber’s Amper­Art #55, Returns & Exchanges, repeats the trip to the same brick-&-mortar store (or the online equiv­a­lent) that Novem­ber’s Amper­Art #54 por­trayed: Stop & Shop (in case you missed it, get tram­pled here). Read More