#50 Fifty & Fabulous

#50 Fifty & Fabulous
#50 Fifty & Fab­u­lous
Click image to down­load full-​size print suit­able for fram­ing or giv­ing to that spe­cial per­son turn­ing 50 — er, 30.

Chaz DeS­i­mone’s 50th Amper­Art release is appro­pri­ate­ly titled Fifty & Fab­u­lous.

There’s noth­ing all that clever in this design…the amper­sand is the Amper­Art logo, a mod­i­fied Gara­mond ital­ic, & the words are set in the Amper­Art brand iden­ti­ty font, Helvetica.

What is spe­cial, though, is you—for tak­ing a look at each of my por­tray­als of “the amper­sand as fun & fab­u­lous art” every month.

Whether you’ve recent­ly sub­scribed or have seen all 50 from the start, thank you for join­ing our com­mu­ni­ty of amper­sand affi­ciana­dos & thank you for men­tion­ing Amper­Art to your friends who are fans of the amper­sand just like we are.

Fifty & Fab­u­lous is usu­al­ly heard around the time peo­ple are near­ing the half-​century mark in their lives. (Of course, we don’t see them as “old,” today’s 50 being the new 30.) So it might be a nice & sim­ple birth­day ges­ture to frame a print or make a card for the Birth­day Boy or Girl fea­tur­ing the new Fifty & Fab­u­lous Amper­Art design. 

FREE 11X17 ART POSTER: Down­load to print a POSTER here. It’s an impres­sive 11x17 inch­es, eas­i­ly print­ed at a copy or office sup­plies store. Same size poster frames are read­i­ly avail­able, too.

FREE 50TH BIRTHDAY/​ANNIVERSARY GREETING CARD: Down­load to make a CUSTOM GREETING CARD here. Prints on stan­dard letter-​size paper or card. For best pre­sen­ta­tion, print at high­est qual­i­ty on pho­to card stock. (The card does not men­tion the word “birth­day” so it can be used for any 50th cel­e­bra­tion. The inside is blank.)

Look at these ideas: Fram­ing & Dis­play­ing Your Amper­Art Print

PRODUCTION NOTES
Orig­i­nal dimen­sions: 20″ x 30″
Pro­gram: Illus­tra­tor, Photoshop
Fonts: Hel­veti­ca, Gara­mond (mod­i­fied as Amper­Art logo)
Back­ground: all​-free​-down​load​.com

Thanks for sub­scrib­ing to Amper­Art. Please invite your ampersand-​fan friends & col­leagues to sub­scribe – tell them it’s fab­u­lous & free.

#41 Whiter & Brighter

This mon­th’s piece for the Adver­tis­ing Slo­gans series fea­tures a term that described the sheets & shirts & under­wear hang­ing on the clothes­line back in 1950 after the joy­ful wash­day expe­ri­ence of a hap­py house­wife (with match­ing daugh­ter) & her beloved box of Rin­so Giant Size Laun­dry Detergent.

Today you don’t see that term used for deter­gent much any­more, but rather for the “whiter & brighter” smile of celebri­ties, pro­fes­sion­als, stu­dents…& hap­py housewives.

But there’s one more mean­ing & it’s just for pix­el push­ers like me. Any­thing over 92 is con­sid­ered “whiter & brighter” in a sheet of paper to print a favorite Amper­Art edi­tion on.

#21 New & Improved, one of my favorite Amper­Art pieces.
First in the Adver­tis­ing Slo­gans series.

How does deter­gent, fab­ric & paper get “brighter than bright”? Flu­o­res­cent whiten­ing agents (FWAs) have been used in many indus­tries, notably the mak­ers of laun­dry deter­gent since the ear­ly 1960s. The blue crys­tals in laun­dry deter­gent are FWAs. The FWAs work by absorb­ing ultra­vi­o­let light, from the sun or flu­o­res­cent bulbs, & then re-​emitting it as a bluish light to make col­ored clothes appear brighter & white ones whiter.

Paper mills have been using FWAs since the 1970s, when paper com­pa­nies found that they could achieve much high­er bright­ness lev­els than with bleach alone.

In 1992, the world con­sump­tion of FWAs was esti­mat­ed at 60,000 tons, with the deter­gent indus­try con­sum­ing 50%, the paper indus­try 33% & the tex­tile indus­try 17%.*

On the oth­er hand, teeth whiten­ing is achieved pri­mar­i­ly with bleach­ing agents such as hydro­gen per­ox­ide & scrub­bing with bak­ing soda — not by spray­ing your teeth with flu­o­res­cent paint.

*Source: Per­ry J. Green­baum, a free­lance busi­ness & tech­nol­o­gy writer, can be reached at pjgreenbaum@​gmail.​com. Excerpt­ed from Pulp & Paper Magazine

Vin­tage ads: vin​tagead​sand​stuff​.com

Pro­duc­tion notes:
Orig­i­nal size: 20x30 inches
Pro­grams: Illus­tra­tor, Photoshop
Fonts: Franklin Goth­ic Extra Con­densed, Brush Script (amper­sand)

This edi­tion would have been released a week ago, except I stum­bled upon a trea­sure trove of old mag­a­zine ads that are view­able online but also avail­able for pur­chase. I could­n’t pull my eyes away from these incred­i­ble exam­ples of adver­tis­ing art the way it was done way before Pho­to­shop — rul­ing pens that leaked, T squares that weren’t square, rub­ber cement that did­n’t stick too well and always kept me in sus­pense whether a piece of type would fall off the board before it went to press.

These vin­tage ads are not repro­duc­tions; they’re actu­al print­ed ads that are clipped from those won­der­ful­ly over­sat­u­rat­ed col­or glossy mag­a­zines of the past century.

A sad note on the web­site is told best by the cura­tor’s own words: ” About four or five months ago I suf­fered a stroke which has caused me to for­get much of what I am sup­posed to do to list ads. I am not able to add scanned images or oth­er things to my site, I just don’t remem­ber how.” I offered to assist and I hope he takes me up on it; his site has giv­en me so much joy.

If you want to see these price­less old ads (some are price­less sim­ply because the orig­i­nal ads were already sold but the dig­i­tal images are still there) and maybe even own an orig­i­nal, vis­it his site, vin​tagead​sand​such​.com

If noth­ing else, please pray for the full recov­ery of this per­son so he can once again enjoy adding images to his website. 

#37 Mistletoe & Loved Ones

Before I present my Christ­mas 2012 Amper­Art design, I wish to to tell you about the two incred­i­ble kids who inspired it.

Lydia Jayne, 12 years old, and her broth­er Alden Blake, 14, are excep­tion­al­ly tal­ent­ed chil­dren. Both of them are visu­al artists and both of them are musi­cians. They’ve even pro­duced short films together.

Just recent­ly they pro­duced their 2012 Christ­mas album. 

When I say “they pro­duced” I real­ly mean that — they pro­duced it all by themselves.
Lydia sang the lyrics and added percussion. 
Alden played all the instru­ments
 — Gui­tar, Bass, Glock­en­spiel, Xylo­phone, Ukulele, and Percussion.
Alden also record­ed, mixed, mas­tered, and pro­duced every­thing. Want more? He is the album cov­er artist as well. In short, there were no adults involved at all! (To men­tor Alden in my area of exper­tise, I changed a few ele­ments on the cov­er art that appears on this Amper­Art page, but not Alden’s orig­i­nal art which is on their own site.)

I’ve known these kids for sev­er­al years, heard them play and watched them draw, but I had no idea they were this incred­i­bly tal­ent­ed. I actu­al­ly had tears lis­ten­ing to Lydi­a’s and Alden’s ren­di­tion of these songs. Lydia has a strong, soul­ful voice and unusu­al­ly great styling – as if she were a vet­er­an songstress. Alden’s inflec­tions, phras­ing and cadence with each of his instru­ments con­veys the pre­cise mean­ing of the part of the song he’s playing.

Lydia and Alden are amaz­ing­ly tal­ent­ed. The term genius comes to mind.
I espe­cial­ly like Lydi­a’s per­son­al­i­ty and Alden’s ukelele on “Hol­ly Jol­ly Christ­mas,” and their heart­felt ren­di­tion of “Oh Holy Night.” For a solo gui­tar treat, lis­ten to Alden’s “Car­ol of the Bells.”

Lis­ten free — click here (http://​lydi​a​jayne​.band​camp​.com/​a​l​b​u​m​/​c​h​r​i​s​t​m​a​s​-​s​p​i​rit)

Enjoy the beau­ti­ful, charm­ing, joy­ous music these chil­dren have cre­at­ed, absolute­ly free. In the spir­it of Christ­mas you may wish to help kick-​start their career by pur­chas­ing a song (name your own price) or the entire album. These chil­dren are donat­ing a por­tion of the pro­ceeds to the World Wildlife Fund. 

These kids, and their Christ­mas album, inspired my 2012 Amper­Art edi­tion. For­tu­nate­ly, one of the album’s songs, “It’s the Most Won­der­ful Time of the Year,” con­tains an amper­sand (actu­al­ly, the word “and”) in the lyrics.

 

 

 

You may view, down­load and print a high-​resolution pdf of this spe­cial Amper­Art edtion here:      Let­ter size 8½x11 inch­es       Tabloid size 11x17 inches

Best wishes for a Christmas season full of happiness, love, cheer, and wondrously beautiful music!