#8 Hide & Seek

Click to download full-size poster

#8 Hide & Seek
Click image to view full size or download poster for gallery-​quality printing & framing.
This is a high-​resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

.1001, 1002, 1003, 1004, 1005…

Ready or not, here I come!

Back in the old days we’d be get­ting antsy right about one-​thousand-​twenty, one-​thousand-​twenty-​one, one-​thousand-​twenty-​two…

But today we can just pass the time tex­ting or play­ing a game (until you score and your “WOOHOO!” gives your hid­ing place away).

I am not a fan of oranges and browns, so I super­sat­u­rat­ed these col­ors almost to the point of pop art. I find the orig­i­nal image far more relax­ing; it does­n’t con­vey the play­ful­ness of hide & seek, nor of autumn. How­ev­er, the pat­tern in the bark is fas­ci­nat­ing.

Now go hide while I start count­ing…


listen up!1960 BC

That’s “Before Com­put­ers” and “Before Cell­phones.” Hide & Seek (no bat­ter­ies required). Met­al skates (no hel­mets, no kneepads). When we scraped our knuck­les on Flexy-​Riders, got soaked skid­ding down our Slip & Slides (see my AmperBr& piece on that one), or sim­ply played check­ers (with a real board and real play­ing pieces). Sim­ple, fun times, but I do enjoy test­ing my skills with the Lumos­i­ty app.


Production notes for #8 Hide & Seek:
Original size: 20x30 inches

Program: Adobe Photoshop
Font: Souvenir

Ampersand: Souvenir (well, whatever’s cheating & peeking)
Credits:
Photos: unknown; tried my best to find the image sources of this early AmperArt image but whoever I “borrowed” them from most likely “borrowed” them from somebody else. Anyway, the composite is heavily altered from the original. If you’re the photographer and would like credit, just let me know. 
You may repost the image & article. Please credit Amper​Art​.com.
To download a full-​size high-​resolution 11x17-​inch poster, click on the image.

For pro­fes­sion­al graph­ic design, please vis­it Des­i­mone Design.

Desimone? Damn good!

#7 In & Out

#7 In & Out

Amper­Art #7: In & Out
.

Hats, helmets and hardhats off to the workforce!

Whether we work 9 to 5, part time, grave­yard, free­lance, or own our own For­tune 500 com­pa­ny, we real­ly do clock in and out. Every moment we’re dri­ving to work, dri­ving a nail, answer­ing email, court­ing a client, or just day­dream­ing about an inven­tion, we are “clocked in.”

And every moment we are “clocked in” we are adding to the val­ue of some­body’s exis­tence, whether through a prod­uct, a pro­fes­sion, or serv­ing a blue plate spe­cial (like my mom did, and always with a smile).

If you are “clocked out” this week­end, enjoy the Labor Day fes­tiv­i­ties. And if you are work­ing, know that your con­tri­bu­tion to what makes this coun­try tick is tru­ly appre­ci­at­ed.


listen up!Work, work, work

Every sin­gle thing I’m touch­ing, look­ing at or lis­ten­ing to right now was made by some­one, or most like­ly hun­dreds of peo­ple, who trad­ed their time, tal­ent, exper­tise, and hard labor for a pay­check.

This mon­i­tor, for exam­ple: the min­ers for the phos­pho­rs; the prod­uct design­ers; the engi­neers; the oil­men who drill for the plas­tic; the sol­der­ers; the print­ers for the UL stick­er; the book­keep­ers, ship­pers, and truck dri­vers; the elec­tri­cal con­trac­tors who sup­ply the pow­er; the tech sup­port; and yes, the graph­ic design­ers who cre­at­ed the pack­ag­ing, adver­tis­ing and instruc­tion man­u­al.
I was lis­ten­ing to an inter­view by the late Bud­dy Rich, jazz drum­mer. When asked if he enjoys his work as a drum­mer, he replied, “Work? What work? I play!”

I love what I do for “work.” Design­ing logos, books, ads and pack­ag­ing; brain­storm­ing with clients; and the thrill of see­ing the first piece off the press is more excit­ing than an exot­ic vaca­tion (some­times just as expen­sive when there’s a typo).

I hope you enjoy what you do, what­ev­er it is. If you don’t, do some­thing else. We do have that choice. If you need some inspi­ra­tion please con­tact me. I am grate­ful that I get to enjoy the earn­ing part of earn­ing a liv­ing, and I’m hap­py to share how it’s pos­si­ble for any­one else.

I love work so much, in fact, I’m going to work on my tan at the pool this Labor Day week­end.

Hap­py Labor Day!

#3 Black & White

3 Black & White


#3 Black & White
Click to view full-​size or download hi-​rez image for gallery-​quality printing and framing.
This is a high-​resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

The basis of most design is black & white. Of initial sketches, anyway. (I always use a black pen & usually scribble on a white napkin.)

Black is my very favorite col­or — & yes, it is a col­or. So is white. How is it so that black & white are both col­ors, you ask? & what about the pop­u­lar (but erro­neous) the­o­ry that states black & white are not col­ors? Read “chaz sez” below.

Black & White, my third Amper­Art piece, is prob­a­bly when I decid­ed to cre­ate a series. One per month, more if inspi­ra­tion hits & time allows. [Update: As of April 2017 and the 100th issue, at least one Amper­Art edi­tion has been released per month, albeit some­times just min­utes before the cal­en­dar flips to a new month.]

Some edi­tions are full col­or, some grayscale, a few just black & white. Many con­tain an amper­sand that is custom-​drawn as part of the main image. Oth­ers fea­ture type to con­vey the char­ac­ter & mean­ing. Some rely on the amper­sand itself to car­ry the mes­sage. You can always see the cur­rent Amper­Art release on the home page of Amper​Art​.com. Or see them all here.

If you are inter­est­ed in the cre­ative process of each piece, scroll to the bot­tom & read the pro­duc­tion notes.

Please tell your friends (espe­cial­ly amper­sand fans) to vis­it Amper​Art​.com. Once they sub­scribe, they will receive Amper­Art #3, Black & White, as well as the pre­mière edi­tion, Amper­Art #1, Art & Design, to start their own col­lec­tion.


listen up!Back is a col­or! Not the absence of col­or, nor the com­bi­na­tion of all col­ors. It is col­or. So is white. So why do peo­ple say it’s all the col­ors or no col­or? Because they don’t know the def­i­n­i­tion of col­or. “Col­or” means the descrip­tion of the hue, val­ue & tone. Pure yel­low is a col­or that has a hue some­where between orange & green on the col­or wheel, a very light val­ue (high-​key, or very bright com­pared to very dark such as navy blue), & min­i­mal tone (gray­ish­ness; mauve & sage green have medi­um tone).

The col­or black is defined by no hue (red, yel­low, blue, etc.), the dark­est val­ue, & zero tone. White is defined by no hue, the light­est val­ue, & zero tone. So you see, black & white have no hue & no tone, but they are both col­ors.

If you want to have some fun with all the oth­er col­ors, check out the Cray­ola web­site, espe­cial­ly the his­to­ry & the Cray­ola Expe­ri­ence where kids (includ­ing big kids) get to play & cre­ate among all things Cray­ola, & see how they are made. If you can’t make it to the fac­to­ry in Eas­t­on, Penn­syl­va­nia, watch this video: How Cray­olas Are Made.

I love Cray­olas. (I won’t use any oth­er brand; the col­ors aren’t as pure, they’re waxy & they just aren’t Cray­ola.) I remem­ber when the box of 64 pre­miered, with the awe­some Built-​In Sharp­en­er. I prob­a­bly have the few stubs that are left of my orig­i­nal set some­where, but today I have The Ulti­mate Cray­ola Col­lec­tion — 152 dif­fer­ent col­ors! — on my desk. I use them fre­quent­ly, & always to sign impor­tant legal doc­u­ments. For that task, of course, it’s Cray­ola Blue Green.


PRODUCTION NOTES FOR #3 BLACK & WHITE:
Original size: 10×15 inches
Program: Photoshop (I have no idea why I didn’t create this one in Illustrator)
Fonts: Kabel, Broadway
Ampersand: Broadway, modified