#189 Space & Time

Re-engineered Webb Telescope becomes first ampersand in space

A picture is worth a thousand worlds.”

I didn’t say that; Google did. On July 13, 2022, I saw this Google Doo­dle & imme­di­ate­ly clicked on it, for­get­ting what­ev­er it was that I was googling. I rec­og­nized the gold hexag­o­nal mir­rors & knew it had some­thing to do with the James Webb Space Tele­scope. Wow — it was announc­ing the first images sent to earth by JWST! Google’s phrase “a pic­ture is worth a thou­sand worlds” is a very clever pun, so I used it to blast off Amper­Art #189, Space & Time. The very first image sent, that of deep space, was used as the back­ground in my lat­est piece. Here’s the Google Doo­dle — click on it to see its amus­ing ani­ma­tion & read about its cre­ative development.

Google Doodle celebrating first images from Webb Telescope
Click the Google Doo­dle to see the ani­ma­tion & read about the artwork.

Have you heard of the James Webb Space Telescope? 

Ear­li­er this week I met a new friend who has been in tech­nol­o­gy through­out his career. I told him how excit­ed I was about the first images of space & time from the new tele­scope, expect­ing him to share in the excite­ment. Instead, he asked “You mean Hub­ble?” He was not even aware of the James Webb Space Tele­scope, Hub­ble’s suc­ces­sor. (He has since told me he Googled it, and said “it’s all over the news!” Yes it is.) 

I was amazed that some­one in tech­nol­o­gy had not heard of this tech­no­log­i­cal won­der. That alert­ed me to real­ize maybe not every­one has heard about the JWST — or oth­er inno­va­tions, for that mat­ter — even if it would be of inter­est to them. So I was com­pelled to add this video to intro­duce those of you (espe­cial­ly if you wit­nessed the first moon land­ing in 1969 on your black & white tubes) who have not heard of this suc­ces­sor to the Hub­ble tele­scope, which is mag­nif­i­cent in its own right & still in ser­vice. You just might be as awed as the rest of us are by the James Webb Space Tele­scope — espe­cial­ly after you see the spec­tac­u­lar first images that were revealed July 12, 2022.

This excel­lent video by Fras­er Cain at uni​ver​se​to​day​.com will explain & entertain:

(If the video does not appear, play it on YouTube.)

For those who pre­fer to read, there’s a good entry about JWST at Wikipedia.

Vis­it the web­sites list­ed below (includ­ing NASA​.org) for more infor­ma­tion about the James Webb Space Telescope.


Space is hard to comprehend…

I have been fol­low­ing the jour­ney of the James Webb Space Tele­scope since it was first launched on Decem­ber 25, 2021. For some rea­son I just feel a deep pride in this ven­ture & I’m thrilled at every task it suc­ceeds in func­tion­ing even bet­ter than expect­ed. It seems like a mir­a­cle that noth­ing has gone wrong when there is so much that could have. Even the traf­fic acci­dent (appar­ent­ly they hap­pen in out­er space, too) of a micro mete­or dent­ing the mir­ror last month was planned ahead & com­pen­sat­ed for. 

It’s hard to com­pre­hend how vast space is & what’s real­ly out there, but…

Planetary Nebula NGC 3132, one of first images from Webb Telescope

…time is even harder

It is beyond my com­pre­hen­sion that what I am look­ing at in these first images from the James Webb Space Tele­scope is from space & time 13 bil­lion years ago. I tru­ly can­not com­pre­hend that! I will just set­tle for admir­ing a spec­tac­u­lar image achieved through the vision & tech­nol­o­gy of bril­liant humans on earth.

The above image, Plan­e­tary Neb­u­la NGC 3132, aka South­ern Ring Neb­u­la, is cap­tured by JWST in dying star’s final moments (albeit very long moments). More fas­ci­na­tion about NGC 3132 here.


AA #189 features Galaxy Cluster SMACS 0723

James Webb Telescope first image: Galaxy Cluster SMACS 0723

This has been one of my favorite Amper­Art cre­ations to date. I am thrilled to design a piece that cel­e­brates the suc­cess — per­form­ing flaw­less­ly & far exceed­ing its expec­ta­tions — of this mar­vel of tech­nol­o­gy, which I have been fol­low­ing since its launch on Decem­ber 25, 2021. 

Not only does this Amper­Art #189 Space & Time back­ground fea­ture the very first image (at right or below) released by the James Webb Space Tele­scope, but the con­fig­u­ra­tion of the tele­scope’s gold mir­rors made for a sim­ple task of cre­at­ing the amper­sand by just mov­ing a few mir­rors around. (The amper­sand tele­scope turned out kin­da cute, don’t you think?)

The image above is the deep­est & sharpest infrared image of the dis­tant uni­verse to date. Known as Webb’s First Deep Field, this image of galaxy clus­ter SMACS 0723 is over­flow­ing with detail. You can see a larg­er ver­sion & read all the details on the NASA web­site. Here are some highlights:

✴ The image above shows the galaxy clus­ter SMACS 0723 as it appeared 4.6 bil­lion years ago. 

✴ This deep field, tak­en by Webb’s Near-​Infrared Cam­era (NIR­Cam), is made from images at dif­fer­ent wave­lengths, total­ing 12.5 hours

✴ Thou­sands of galax­ies – includ­ing the faintest objects ever observed in the infrared – have appeared in Webb’s view for the first time.

Now this should real­ly send your mind to infin­i­ty & beyond:

✴ This slice of the vast uni­verse — every­thing you see in the image above — is approx­i­mate­ly the size of a grain of rice held at arm’s length by some­one on the ground.


Alien lifeforms

I’m sure if JWST ever finds a colony of intel­li­gent beings out there, they will all be naked. & hap­py. Maybe that’s what it will take to enlight­en us earth­lings to final­ly strip away our prud­ish, igno­rant, sense­less cen­sor­ship against our own bod­ies. After all, as my favorite bumper stick­er says: 


There’s plen­ty of space & time for a bil­lion words or less, so please…


Explore the James Webb Space Telescope & Mission & Images

NASA James Webb Space Telescope mission

First images from Webb Space Telescope

The ultimate guide to the James Webb Space Telescope

Other “webbsites” about the Webb Telescope


Production notes for #189 Space &Time:
Original size: 20x30 inches

Programs: Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop
Font: Tall Films

Ampersand: custom by Chaz DeSimone, based on JWST mirror array
Credits:
NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI

Background image: NASA & deposit​pho​tos​.com (enhanced)
“A picture is worth a thousand worlds.” quote from Google​.com
Text about the JWST from Wikipedia​.org
Video: Fraser Cain, uni​ver​se​to​day​.com
You may repost the image & article. Please credit Amper​Art​.com.
To download a full-​size high-​resolution 11x17-​inch poster suitable for printing & framing, click on the image.

Visit DesimoneDesign.com
Proper
Professional
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Chaz DeS­i­mone, design­er & typog­ra­ph­er, is the cre­ator of Amper­Art & own­er of Des­i­mone Design. He was adding ser­ifs to let­ters when he was just a lit­tle brat scrib­bling on walls. Now he’s a big brat & his entire career is design, so long as each project requires the most sophis­ti­cat­ed, log­i­cal, cap­ti­vat­ing results. Con­tact him at chaz@​desimonedesign.​com.

Thank you for sub­scrib­ing to Chaz’s per­son­al design project, Amper­Art. Please invite your friends — those who are fans of the fun & fab­u­lous amper­sand — to sub­scribe at amper​art​.com.


chaz sez...
rants & raves by Chaz Desimone, otherwise known as Chaz the Spaz
Want more?
Rants & raves mostly about design, sometimes about the universe.
An occasional bit of useful advice.
Read the blog:
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Desimone Design

#160 LGBTQ&


My parents were told that I was mentally retarded.

I don’t know if it was the fam­i­ly doc­tor or the school coun­selor, but they def­i­nite­ly said I was men­tal­ly retard­ed (back when that term was acceptable).

I walked retarded-​like, as if I was going to fall over & I did not like play­ing sports (I was even afraid of the dodge ball) & I doo­dled & stared out the win­dow in class.

My dad would not stand for what he was told! He demand­ed a sec­ond opinion.

That expert said that I walked fun­ny because I was born with a sway back. He got me doing some exer­cis­es to cor­rect it. (I still don’t have the best pos­ture but peo­ple don’t laugh at me any­more.) He said I sim­ply don’t like sports. I’d rather be think­ing and draw­ing, which is why I stared out the win­dow and doo­dled. (Lat­er on that doo­dling turned into let­ter­ing & graph­ic design, but I do still over­think my lay­outs and logos…or maybe not.)

Point is, I know how it feels to be con­sid­ered dif­fer­ent. I was ridiculed, always picked last for sports (did­n’t mind that one bit), and was con­sid­ered the school nerd. I was dif­fer­ent and knew it. I had to deal with it. 

That’s why I am empa­thet­ic to any­one who is dif­fer­ent and has to deal with it. Among oth­ers, that includes the LGBTQ& com­mu­ni­ty which cel­e­brates their “dif­fer­ent­ness” every June — with pride.


June is LGBTQ& Pride Month 

That’s LGBTQ& for amper­sand fans. For every­one else it’s LGBTQ+ but it means the same exact thing. The plus sign is a just a sim­pli­fied amper­sand — see?

plus sign is just a stripped down ampersand

This Amper­Art piece was orig­i­nal­ly cre­at­ed in May or June 2020, but I got so involved in select­ing & posi­tion­ing the let­ters of the acronym, & then spend­ing lots of time research­ing the ori­gin of the flag & oth­er his­to­ry about LGBTQ&, along with relat­ed ter­mi­nol­o­gy, facts & feel­ings, that I told myself “to be con­tin­ued next year.” 

Then in 2021 I dis­cov­ered all sorts of new acronyms (includ­ing LGBTQIA& which is com­mon today, but also extend­ed ver­sions such as LGBTIQCAPGNGFNBA+) & a whole slew of gen­der icons (take a look at the back­ground of the art­work), think­ing I need­ed to start over with design. But I liked my orig­i­nal art­work, how every­thing fit, & the fact it was a spec­trum of exact­ly six col­ors, same as the cur­rent LGBTQ& flag. So what to do? After heavy con­sid­er­a­tion I had the “aha” idea: Leave the main art­work alone, but add the var­i­ous gen­der icons to the back­ground. (I chose from what appeared to be an author­i­ta­tive source. If any­one wants to sug­gest more or dif­fer­ent icons I’ll glad­ly con­sid­er mod­i­fy­ing the back­ground pat­tern. I feel it’s impor­tant to be rep­re­sent­ed accu­rate­ly & respect­ful­ly. Just leave a comment.) 

Well, you guessed it: it took awhile to make those revi­sions, then to write about them & what each sym­bol means, so half-​way into June 2021 I once again shelved this piece until this month, LGBTQ& Pride Month 2022. I got back to work on the edi­to­r­i­al in mid-​May so it could be released as my May 2022 Amper­Art (which it was, today the 30th). Prob­lem was I still had the sto­ry to write & a ton of ref­er­ence mate­r­i­al to sort through, and that would take days.

History of the Flag

The orig­i­nal con­cept for the LGBT flag, designed by Gilbert Bak­er in 1978.

Picture now & 1000 words later

A pic­ture is worth a thou­sand words, they say, so I’ve decid­ed to post the pic­ture now — the final Amper­Art design #160 LGBTQ& — & con­tin­ue adding to this sto­ry as I write about each topic:

  • (post­ed 5/​30/​22) My empa­thy with those who are “not main­stream,” because I’ve always been a lit­tle dif­fer­ent than my peers (even diag­nosed as men­tal­ly retard­ed, when that term was polit­i­cal­ly cor­rect). I’m straight, but I have a lot of gay (& oth­er gen­ders, I’m sure) friends & tru­ly enjoy their com­pa­ny. I under­stand what it’s like to be con­sid­ered “dif­fer­ent.”
  • (post­ed 6/​15/​22) The his­to­ry of the first Rain­bow Flag, which is inter­est­ing & a bit amus­ing why it had to be changed slightly. 
  • The grad­ual accep­tance lead­ing up to — final­ly — the Supreme Court “affirm­ing that every human being should be treat­ed with respect & dignity.”
  • A look at the oth­er sexual-​orientation terms & icons.
  • Final­ly, my one & only rant against the LGBTQ& com­mu­ni­ty, which has to do with my spe­cial­ty, brand identity.

I can’t promise when I’ll get to these top­ics — this June or Pride Month next June, or some­where in between. But the issue & the peo­ple are impor­tant to me, so I will keep adding to the arti­cle right here. I will also send out a newslet­ter at the con­clu­sion of each topic.

The orig­i­nal con­cep­tu­al devel­op­ment for Amper­Art #160 LGBTQ&, 2020

Production notes for #160 LGBTQ&:
Original size: 20x30 inches

Programs: Adobe Illustrator
Fonts:
L: Benguiat Charisma
G: Dyer Arts & Crafts
B: Monoton
T: Poppl Residenz & Rockwell (modified)
Q: (custom)
Ampersand: Palatino (modified)
Credits:
Background image: deposit​pho​tos​.com (modified)
Original flag reference: https://​myfopin​ion​.word​press​.com/​2​0​1​9​/​0​6​/​2​3​/​h​i​s​t​o​r​y​-​o​f​-​t​h​e​-​p​r​i​d​e​-​f​l​ag/
Note: &” replaces “and” in most or all text, including quotations, headlines & titles.
Original flag reference:https://myfopinion.wordpress.com/2019/06/23/history-of-the-pride-flag/
You may repost the image & article. Please credit Amper​Art​.com.
To download a full-​size high-​resolution 11x17-​inch poster suitable for printing & framing, click on the image.

Visit DesimoneDesign.com

Chaz DeS­i­mone, design­er & typog­ra­ph­er, is the cre­ator of Amper­Art & own­er of Des­i­mone Design. He was adding ser­ifs to let­ters when he was just a lit­tle brat scrib­bling on walls. Now he’s a big brat & his entire career is design, so long as each project requires the most sophis­ti­cat­ed, log­i­cal, cap­ti­vat­ing results. Con­tact him at chaz@​desimonedesign.​com.

Thank you for sub­scrib­ing to Chaz’s per­son­al design project, Amper­Art. Please invite your friends — those who are fans of the fun & fab­u­lous amper­sand — to sub­scribe at amper​art​.com.

Chaz sez...
Want more?
Rants & raves mostly about design, sometimes about the universe.
An occasional bit of useful advice.
Read the blog:
des​i​monedesign​.com/​c​h​a​z​-​sez
Desimone Design
Desimone Design

#187 Each & Every


When the idea for #187 Each & Every came to me, I thought there would be nothing to write about

I recalled about a few instances where I’ve heard the term used, such as:

Each & every time there’s a tight dead­line, the com­put­er crashes.

We should exer­cise, even just a lit­tle, each & every day.

Each & every pen­ny counts. (This was espe­cial­ly true when our mom raised 4 young chil­dren on her own after our dad passed away at an ear­ly age.)

My favorite teacher gave each & every stu­dent extra spe­cial attention.

Each & every dessert was tempting.

Then I realized there are lots of things I can personally relate that phrase to:

I don’t actu­al­ly inspect each & every pix­el in my work, as I am known to pro­fess. (You know how micro­scop­ic a pix­el is?)

I have loved each & every cat I’ve ever owned that’s ever owned me: Tiger, Black­wolf, Amos & Andy, Bri­quette, Bebe, Jeep­ers Creep­ers, Lil’ Lion, & S.F.Squiggles

I love each & every one of my sib­lings deeply and equal­ly: Roz, Andy, & Rob

I am grate­ful for each & every one of my very best friends, clients, & vendors.

I appre­ci­ate each & every one of you, my Amper­Art subscribers.

& finally:

Each & every month I’ve cre­at­ed a new Amper­Art issue for the past eleven years.
Each & every month? Whoa.



Concept & design

The con­cept came instan­ta­neous­ly: spell out the words, let­ter­spaced, & cir­cle the let­ters indi­vid­u­al­ly or col­lec­tive­ly with a pen. But uh-​oh, the last time I used my Wacom draw­ing tablet was before a major com­put­er update & now the tablet’s a high-​tech triv­et. (I’ll donate it to some­one with an old­er OS.) I just hap­pened to pur­chase an Apple Pen­cil with my iPad, so this would be a good time to give it a test run. I cre­at­ed the typog­ra­phy in Illus­tra­tor on my large mon­i­tor, then to add the scrib­ble around the let­ters with the pen, I saved the doc­u­ment to the cloud & opened it on the iPad with a lighter ver­sion of Illus­tra­tor (devel­oped specif­i­cal­ly for such a device). After a small learn­ing curve, I was able to scrib­ble around those let­ters on a sep­a­rate lay­er, try­ing sev­er­al times until it was just right, then sent it back to the large mon­i­tor for final tweaks. That was a very suc­cess­ful cre­ative process. & all I thought the iPad was good for was bing­ing on too much TV & inspect­ing my web­site layouts.

Got­ta go binge now…


Production notes for #187 Each & Every:
Original size: 20x30 inches
Program: Adobe Illustrator
Font: Agency
Ampersand: hand-​scribbled
Credits:
No production credits this time, but inspiration credit goes to each & every one of you, ampersand fans!
Note: &” replaces “and” in most or all text, including quotations, headlines & titles.
You may repost the image & article. Please credit Amper​Art​.com.
To download a full-​size high-​resolution 11x17-​inch poster suitable for printing & framing, click on the image.

Chaz DeS­i­mone is the cre­ator of Amper­Art and own­er of Des­i­mone Design. He was adding ser­ifs to let­ters when he was just a lit­tle brat scrib­bling on walls. Now he’s a big brat and his entire career is design for clients who desire the most sophis­ti­cat­ed, log­i­cal, cap­ti­vat­ing cre­ative. Con­tact him at chaz@​desimonedesign.​com to dis­cuss your project, pick his brain, or just talk shop.


Chaz sez...

Who banned the ampersand?

Whoever thought up the syntax for Universal Resource Locators (URLs) was 100% coder & 0% copywriter. No foresight whatsoever. We can’t even use common punctuation in a URL except for the hyphen & underscore. It sure makes all the AmperArt URLs ugly & hard to understand—no ampersands allowed!
This is just one of the rants on my blog, chaz sez.
Rants & raves mostly about design, sometimes about the universe.
An occasional bit of useful advice.
Read the blog:

des​i​monedesign​.com/​c​h​a​z​-​sez
Desimone Design
Desimone Design