#65 Black & Blue

65-black-blue


Click to view full-​size or download hi-​rez image for gallery-​quality printing and framing.
This is a high-​resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

My favorite col­ors are black & “char­lie blue.”

Black is actu­al­ly my very favorite col­or & yes, it is a col­or. (See “chaz sez” below.) “Char­lie blue,” as my friends know it, is any­thing between Cray­ola Blue Green to cerulean to turquoise to cyan (one of the four print­ing ink col­ors). Amper­Art #65, Black & Blue, fea­tures CBG as I call it, cyan, and one oth­er blue which I’ll get to lat­er. All my favorite blues are some­where in-​between CBG and cyan.

I am not fond of sky blue, navybaby blue nor roy­al blue. They are cold. (Yes, I know, my very favorite col­or—black—is def­i­nite­ly freez­ing. But we’re talk­ing blue here.)

There is a very deep blue that does tin­gle my col­or bone. That’s cobalt blue. My first mem­o­ry of that col­or is my father’s blue cuff links. Also the knob on his steer­ing wheel to help turn the tires before pow­er steer­ing (that acces­so­ry became ille­gal because when the steer­ing wheel snapped back the knob could remove a fin­ger or two). & the cool red tail lights with the blue dot in the mid­dle, which cre­at­ed a mag­i­cal col­or effect.  They’re pop­u­lar again today but I remem­ber the orig­i­nals on my dad’s 1950-​something auto­mo­bile. Prob­a­bly no oth­er rec­ol­lec­tion of cobalt blue is stronger for me than the bot­tle of Vicks VapoRub. That stuff felt ice-​cold as the col­or of the bot­tle it was pack­aged in. I’m also par­tial to cobalt blue because it is the favorite col­or of my moth­er and my broth­er Rob. So that is the oth­er blue in this Amper­Art piece.

Vicks-jar-with-lid-circle

Just look­ing at this Vicks jar opens my sinus­es! Oth­er prod­ucts in cobalt blue bot­tles were Noxze­ma, Phillips Milk of Mag­ne­sia (sounds appe­tiz­ing, does­n’t it?), Bro­mo Seltzer, Nivea and Blue Coral.

In fair­ness to navy, roy­al blue, sky blue & all those that are not my favorites, com­bine them with var­i­ous oth­er col­ors & they cre­ate out­stand­ing col­or schemes. Of course, the same could be said for poop brown.

I am releas­ing #65 Black & Blue dur­ing the play­ful days of sum­mer, because that’s when I recall we’d get the most bruised up falling off our bikes, skate­boards, or just play­ing in the back­yard. I did, any­way. I was a real klutz. Still can’t ride a skateboard.


listen up! Black is a col­or! Not the absence of col­or, nor the com­bi­na­tion of all col­ors. It is col­or. So is white. So why do peo­ple say it’s all the col­ors or no col­or? Because they don’t know the def­i­n­i­tion of col­or. “Col­or” means the descrip­tion of the hue, val­ue & tone. Pure yel­low is a col­or that has a hue some­where between orange & green on the col­or wheel, a very light val­ue (high-​key, or very bright com­pared to very dark such as navy blue), & min­i­mal tone (gray­ish­ness; mauve & sage green have medi­um tone).

The col­or black is defined by no hue (red, yel­low, blue, etc.), the dark­est val­ue, & zero tone. White is defined by no hue, the light­est val­ue, & zero tone. So you see, black & white have no hue & no tone, but they are both colors.

If you want to have some fun with all the oth­er col­ors, check out the Cray­ola web­site, espe­cial­ly the his­to­ry & the Cray­ola Expe­ri­ence where kids (includ­ing big kids) get to play & cre­ate among all things Cray­ola, & see how they are made. If you can’t make it to the fac­to­ry in Eas­t­on, Penn­syl­va­nia, watch this video: How Cray­olas Are Made.

I love Cray­olas. (I won’t use any oth­er brand; the col­ors aren’t as pure, they’re waxy & they just aren’t Cray­ola.) I remem­ber when the box of 64 pre­miered, with the awe­some Built-​In Sharp­en­er. I prob­a­bly have the few stubs that are left of my orig­i­nal set some­where, but today I have The Ulti­mate Cray­ola Col­lec­tion — 152 dif­fer­ent col­ors! — on my desk. I use them fre­quent­ly, & always to sign impor­tant legal doc­u­ments. For that task, of course, it’s Cray­ola Blue Green.


PRODUCTION NOTES:
Original size: 20×30 inches
Program: Illustrator
Lettering: Hand-​lettered by Chaz DeSimone
Colors: Cyan, cobalt blue, Crayola Blue Green & black
CREDITS:
Vicks ad: flickr​.com/​p​h​o​t​o​s​/​2​8​1​5​3​7​8​3​@​N​08/ “SaltyCotton” has nearly 2000 photos of vintage ads in pristine condition. An ad designer’s or collector’s eye candy overload!
Vicks jar: Joe Corr on pin​ter​est​.com/​p​i​n​/​2​7​4​9​3​0​7​5​2​2​2​5​6​7​2​7​32/ and etsy​.com/​s​h​o​p​/​o​w​l​s​o​n​g​v​i​n​t​age Beautiful collectibles and antiques.
 
Enjoy & share…

8 thoughts to “#65 Black & Blue”

  1. Cuff Links? Steer­ing Knobs? WOW! Old Stuff. It’s amaz­ing how you remem­ber so many details from when you were younger. You have a gift of sto­ry telling. Thanks for sharing.

  2. Ooh! This is COOL! Reminds me of some record album cov­ers of my par­ents from the 60’s!
    As usu­al, too, your com­men­tary is most excel­lent read­ing! I also love cobalt blue, espe­cial­ly in glass, because it reminds me of my moth­er and her moth­er. And, of course, I cracked-​up at the com­ment that you sign all your impor­tant legal doc­u­ments with Cray­ola Blue-​Green! I need­ed a laugh! Thanks for the “mini-​vacation” I always go on when I gaze upon your design and read your most inter­est­ing insights and memories.

    1. I’ve been lis­ten­ing to some cool jazz late­ly, and I felt the ’60s album cov­ers as I was design­ing this. Almost wrote about that, but I’ll save it for my “Rhythm & Blues” piece. As for the dot­ted line, I real­ly do.

      1. Hi Chaz,

        Anoth­er great poster this is my month­ly fix. I look for­ward every month to see what you have to say and what the poster will look like. I agree with You Chaz reminds me of Blue’s cov­ers and Lisa only thing I was think­ing of my albums not my parents.

    1. Some­day when I have absolute­ly noth­ing else to do, I want to research how the web peo­ple came up with the hex codes for the col­ors. 000000 is the only one that makes sense!

  3. Love this one. Super inter­est­ing. I was won­der­ing about the let­ter­ing and saw in your notes that you did them by hand. That’s what caught my eye first — the place­ment of the let­ters. Very cool!

    1. This style of let­ter­ing is called “inter­lock” and there is a type­style by that name, very pop­u­lar in the 50s and 60s. There are oth­er sim­i­lar fonts as well, but the best effect is usu­al­ly custom-​rendered, much the same as a script or hand­writ­ten style. To make my job eas­i­er, I start­ed off with set­ting the words in Impact, then stretched them and mod­ifed most of the nodes.The amper­sand was cre­at­ed from scratch.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.