#52 Quality & Dependability

Like my Jeep!


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AmperArt #52, QUALITY & DEPENDABILITY, is from the AmperArt Advertising Slogan series. It’s a term that used to be more prevalent, decades before today’s Cheap & Disposable merchandise. Other words that come to mind are: solid, reliable, unconditionally guaranteed (not just a limited warranty) & service with a smile.


 

listen up!I remember when products were made with quality & they were truly dependable. Not so much anymore (except for Jeeps & iPhones & OXO*). But I am very glad that I have friends who fit the description of QUALITY & DEPENDABILITY. My family & friends are of the highest integrity—honest, genuine, sincere—& they are very dependable—from helping out in a pinch to being on time. Unlike most of today’s products, my friends are not disposable!


*My love affair with OXO

(as in hugs & kisses, although that’s not what the name was intended to imply)

OXO is an outstanding company, truly the definition of QUALITY & DEPENDABILITY. I love the visual & comfortable styling of their products (which is mostly kitchenware), the carefully R&D’d usefulness (unlike some gadgets that are more difficult to use than if the task was rendered manually), & even the name & logo. Okay, very much the name & logo, even though I’m not a fan of red.

Their absolutely no-questions-asked guarNow I even enjoy doing my dishes!antee was put to the test recently when my OXO soap-dispensing dish brush broke (quite surprisingly—although I use it constantly as it even turns washing dishes into a likeable task). In searching for the instructions to get a replacement, I thoroughly enjoyed visiting several pages on the OXO website, as each one introduced me to another amazing facet of their company: the origin of the name; how each product is developed; and the personalities & hobbies of their employees. One of those wonderful employees, a cheerful woman by the name of Brooke, answered my questions about the broken brush & she struck up a conversation as if we were old friends.

“Would you like the same model or the newer model with added features?” (Newer, of course—& I do like the added features, including the fact that it’s completely black, no red, not even the logo.) She asked if I could send a photo of the broken part—but it’s okay if I couldn’t. (I did.) She said they’ll send a replacement out immediately. (They did. Immediately.)

Brooke even subscribed to my personal design project (which you’re reading now), AmperArt.com, which really showed me how kind & considerate the Oxonians are (their term, not mine). Hey! “Kind & Considerate”…that’ll be a new AmperArt creation!

In case you’re wondering…no, this is not a sponsored endorsement. I simply love OXO! (They say it’s pronounced “ox-oh” but I prefer “o-x-o” and when I told Brooke why, she even noted my reason.) Someday I’ll write an amazing testimonial about my ’96 Jeep which just won’t quit, or Apple, which is ahead of any other device by eons.

You will probably enjoy the OXO website (oxo.com), especially the about page for some interesting facts & figures. Further down the page, you’ll experience a refreshingly human experience as you learn about the employees’ favorite hobbies, pets, languages & inventive uses for their products (use the spaghetti strainer as a backscratcher). If you want a personal review of my OXO experience, just email me, or read about my favorite dishwashing tool, even more than the automatic dishwasher, here.


 Please tell other ampersand fans about the
QUALITY
of  each AmperArt design & the
DEPENDABILITY
of one issue per month, guaranteed. 

They can subscribe
HERE 
Thank you.


 

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Original size: 20×30 inches
Program: InDesign
Fonts: Copperplate, Industria, English Script (ampersand)
Inspiration: Maytag washing machines, Craftsman tools, Jeeps—all from the 1950s & 60s

#48 Cool & Comfortable

AmperArt #48 Cool & Comfortable


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“Cool & Comfortable” was a popular advertising slogan before mid-century, as far back as the 1920s, & then again after mid-century,  right up through the Disco Era.

Early on, it was used to draw crowds to air-conditioned movie palaces & businesses — “It’s cool inside!” — which were often colder than the local storage plant.

A few decades later the fashion world (if you can call polyester jump suits fashion) claimed its revolutionary new man-made fabrics were Cool & Comfortable. & sexy.

Enjoy some old ads for “modern air control” and “mod fashion”…

This 1953 The Saturday Evening Post photo features both synthetic air & synthetic fabrics. The caption says “Baby, it’s cool inside! A singed sun bather is invited to beat the heat inside an air-cooled Las Vegas, Nev., hotel. Next: air-conditioned streets.” Looks more like he’s saying “You want heat, you got heat. Don’t open that door & let the cold air out!”

1953-newsp-ad-air-cond500

You might enjoy these entire pages from that edition which contain wonderful old ads & some interesting facts about the evolution of a/c on The Saturday Evening Post’s website.

Decades later, this ad promises instant love & romance just by slipping on this one-piece wonder:

polyesterMore great fashion of the era, posted by Steve Hauben of the Data + Design Project:: Cool & Comfortable (& Sexy) Polyester

Choose one: Does my latest background image remind you of a sexy fashion textile or a sexy air conditioner filter? Either way, stay Cool & Comfortable this summer.


 

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Original dimensions: 20″ x 30″
Programs: Illustrator, Photoshop
Fonts: Teen (a font which is very similar to a loose, contemporary hand-lettering style of the era), Amienne (ampersand)
Ampersand: Amienne (tilted)
Background: pattern from SquidFingers.com (lots of free patterns); posted by 1stwebdesigner.com (22 free seamless pattern sources)
CREDITS:
Air conditioning photo: Gene Lester, The Saturday Evening Post, June 6, 1953.
Clothing ad: Visual News; posted by Steve Hauben

 

chazsezLOGO-85x64

It’s been Cool & Comfortable in Southern California the past couple weeks (I like the heat, so anything below 100 degrees Fahrenheit is fine by me), but two weeks ago it was so hot I blew three circuit breakers till I found the outlet that could handle the air conditioner in my studio. Even when I’m not around I want my cats to be Cool & Comfortable.

I hope you are enjoying your summer. Thanks for subscribing to AmperArt. Please invite your ampersand-fan friends & colleagues to subscribe–tell them it’s fabulous & free.

 

#41 Whiter & Brighter

This month’s piece for the Advertising Slogans series features a term that described the sheets & shirts & underwear hanging on the clothesline back in 1950 after the joyful washday experience of a happy housewife (with matching daughter) & her beloved box of Rinso Giant Size Laundry Detergent.

Today you don’t see that term used for detergent much anymore, but rather for the “whiter & brighter” smile of celebrities, professionals, students…& happy housewives.

But there’s one more meaning & it’s just for pixel pushers like me. Anything over 92 is considered “whiter & brighter” in a sheet of paper to print a favorite AmperArt edition on.

#21 New & Improved, one of my favorite AmperArt pieces.
First in the Advertising Slogans series.

How does detergent, fabric & paper get “brighter than bright”? Fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) have been used in many industries, notably the makers of laundry detergent since the early 1960s. The blue crystals in laundry detergent are FWAs. The FWAs work by absorbing ultraviolet light, from the sun or fluorescent bulbs, & then re-emitting it as a bluish light to make colored clothes appear brighter & white ones whiter.

Paper mills have been using FWAs since the 1970s, when paper companies found that they could achieve much higher brightness levels than with bleach alone.

In 1992, the world consumption of FWAs was estimated at 60,000 tons, with the detergent industry consuming 50%, the paper industry 33% & the textile industry 17%.*

On the other hand, teeth whitening is achieved primarily with bleaching agents such as hydrogen peroxide & scrubbing with baking soda — not by spraying your teeth with fluorescent paint.

*Source: Perry J. Greenbaum, a freelance business & technology writer, can be reached at pjgreenbaum@gmail.com. Excerpted from Pulp & Paper Magazine

Vintage ads: vintageadsandstuff.com

Production notes:
Original size: 20×30 inches
Programs: Illustrator, Photoshop
Fonts: Franklin Gothic Extra Condensed, Brush Script (ampersand)

This edition would have been released a week ago, except I stumbled upon a treasure trove of old magazine ads that are viewable online but also available for purchase. I couldn’t pull my eyes away from these incredible examples of advertising art the way it was done way before Photoshop — ruling pens that leaked, T squares that weren’t square, rubber cement that didn’t stick too well and always kept me in suspense whether a piece of type would fall off the board before it went to press.

These vintage ads are not reproductions; they’re actual printed ads that are clipped from those wonderfully oversaturated color glossy magazines of the past century.

A sad note on the website is told best by the curator’s own words: ” About four or five months ago I suffered a stroke which has caused me to forget much of what I am supposed to do to list ads. I am not able to add scanned images or other things to my site, I just don’t remember how.” I offered to assist and I hope he takes me up on it; his site has given me so much joy.

If you want to see these priceless old ads (some are priceless simply because the original ads were already sold but the digital images are still there) and maybe even own an original, visit his site, vintageadsandsuch.com

If nothing else, please pray for the full recovery of this person so he can once again enjoy adding images to his website.