#93 Work & Turn

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#93 Work & Turn
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“Work & Turn” is a term used by printers to print both sides of a sheet of paper with just one plate & one press set-up.

Find a complete list of printing terms at wcbs4printing.com. For more information about this outstanding full-service printer, see the “chaz sez” column  below.

What is “work & turn”?

In the case of a two-sided flyer, the work & turn job’s plate & paper will be large enough to contain two full flyers. The plate is set up to print both the front & back images of the flyer in just one pass. The printed work & turn sheet will look like the AmperArt Work & Turn art, above, containing two full flyers where the front side is adjacent to the back side.*

Then then the paper is flipped end-for-end (after the ink is dry) so the printed side is down and the blank side is up, & then printed again with the same plate. In this way, the front of each flyer will contain the opposite image on the back. (It’s important to flip the paper the right way, or each flyer could contain two “front” sides or two “back” sides. Yes, I’ve made that mistake.)

The sheets are then cut apart in the center to make two finished items, like this—each work & turn flyer will have a front & a back side:

front & back of a work & turn job

Although one plate could be used for a 1-color work & turn job, several plates would be required for full-color printing such as shown in the AmperArt Work & Turn artwork. Still, only one press set-up is required with only one set of plates, not a separate set for front & back. The paper is passed through, flipped, & passed through again.

*Technical note: The Amperart Work & Turn image would actually be printed full-bleed (not shown in the AmperArt Work & Turn piece), then trimmed on all four sides as well as in half. But full bleed is another discussion. “Bleed,” “work & turn,” and other printing jargon is explained in a comprehensive glossary page at wcbs4printing.com. For more information about this outstanding printer, keep reading…


chaz sez ...

Here’s a real coincidence: I searched Google for “work & turn” to find a simple definition which I could modify for my readers. The page I was lead to is wcbs4printing.com printing terms, an excellent list of printing terms provided by a full-service printer in Palm Desert—just a few towns over from me! Of the thousands of printers all over the world, I find this to be quite a coincidence…like an invitation for a short drive to take in the wonderful smell of ink & hear the roar of the presses.

The full list of services & outstanding testimonials have enticed me to ask wcbs4printing.com for a quote on an upcoming print job. And when a client needs custom-printed bags, badge holders, bookmarks, luggage straps & tags, magnets, mugs, name badges, passport wallets, pens or post-it notes…
their specialty division, wcbs4LogoProducts.com, handles all those items.

Small world. Or as the TV soap goes, As the World Work & Turns.


Production notes for #93 Work & Turn:
Original size: 20×30 inches
Program: Adobe Illustrator
Fonts: Rockwell, Bodoni, DIN Schrift
Ampersand: DIN Schrift, modified

Related article in the Printing & Publishing series:
#63 Upper & Lowercase


For professional graphic design, please visit Desimone Design.

Desimone? Damn good!

#65 Black & Blue

65-black-blue


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My favorite colors are black & “charlie blue.”

Black is actually my very favorite color & yes, it is a color. (See “chaz sez” below.) “Charlie blue,” as my friends know it, is anything between Crayola Blue Green to cerulean to turquoise to cyan (one of the four printing ink colors). AmperArt #65, Black & Blue, features CBG as I call it, cyan, and one other blue which I’ll get to later. All my favorite blues are somewhere in-between CBG and cyan.

I am not fond of sky blue, navybaby blue nor royal blue. They are cold. (Yes, I know, my very favorite color—black—is definitely freezing. But we’re talking blue here.)

There is a very deep blue that does tingle my color bone. That’s cobalt blue. My first memory of that color is my father’s blue cuff links. Also the knob on his steering wheel to help turn the tires before power steering (that accessory became illegal because when the steering wheel snapped back the knob could remove a finger or two). & the cool red tail lights with the blue dot in the middle, which created a magical color effect.  They’re popular again today but I remember the originals on my dad’s 1950-something automobile. Probably no other recollection of cobalt blue is stronger for me than the bottle of Vicks VapoRub. That stuff felt ice-cold as the color of the bottle it was packaged in. I’m also partial to cobalt blue because it is the favorite color of my mother and my brother Rob. So that is the other blue in this AmperArt piece.

Vicks-jar-with-lid-circle

Just looking at this Vicks jar opens my sinuses! Other products in cobalt blue bottles were Noxzema, Phillips Milk of Magnesia (sounds appetizing, doesn’t it?), Bromo Seltzer, Nivea and Blue Coral.

In fairness to navy, royal blue, sky blue & all those that are not my favorites, combine them with various other colors & they create outstanding color schemes. Of course, the same could be said for poop brown.

I am releasing #65 Black & Blue during the playful days of summer, because that’s when I recall we’d get the most bruised up falling off our bikes, skateboards, or just playing in the backyard. I did, anyway. I was a real klutz. Still can’t ride a skateboard.


listen up! Black is a color! Not the absence of color, nor the combination of all colors. It is color. So is white. So why do people say it’s all the colors or no color? Because they don’t know the definition of color. “Color” means the description of the hue, value & tone. Pure yellow is a color that has a hue somewhere between orange & green on the color wheel, a very light value (high-key, or very bright compared to very dark such as navy blue), & minimal tone (grayishness; mauve & sage green have medium tone).

The color black is defined by no hue (red, yellow, blue, etc.), the darkest value, & zero tone. White is defined by no hue, the lightest value, & zero tone. So you see, black & white have no hue & no tone, but they are both colors.

If you want to have some fun with all the other colors, check out the Crayola website, especially the history & the Crayola Experience where kids (including big kids) get to play & create among all things Crayola, & see how they are made. If you can’t make it to the factory in Easton, Pennsylvania, watch this video: How Crayolas Are Made.

I love Crayolas. (I won’t use any other brand; the colors aren’t as pure, they’re waxy & they just aren’t Crayola.) I remember when the box of 64 premiered, with the awesome Built-In Sharpener. I probably have the few stubs that are left of my original set somewhere, but today I have The Ultimate Crayola Collection—152 different colors!—on my desk. I use them frequently, & always to sign important legal documents. For that task, of course, it’s Crayola Blue Green.


PRODUCTION NOTES:
Original size: 20×30 inches
Program: Illustrator
Lettering: Hand-lettered by Chaz DeSimone
Colors: Cyan, cobalt blue, Crayola Blue Green & black
CREDITS:
Vicks ad: flickr.com/photos/28153783@N08/ “SaltyCotton” has nearly 2000 photos of vintage ads in pristine condition. An ad designer’s or collector’s eye candy overload!
Vicks jar: Joe Corr on pinterest.com/pin/274930752225672732/ and etsy.com/shop/owlsongvintage Beautiful collectibles and antiques.
 

#58 Up & Running

58-up-&-running500x750i


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If you’re reading this…

You can thank a superb web technology expert and all-around great guy I recently met: Steve Wolfson of Mountain Web Development in Ashland, Oregon. Simply put, he got my broken website Up & Running quickly, expertly, and inexpensively. (more…)

#51 Salt & Pepper

51-salt-pepper

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Daddy died March 29, 1962, over a half century ago. I was 10 years old. He was 62.

Now I am 62.

You can imagine March 29 this year has been on my mind a lot lately. I am healthy, still feel young and strong (until I do something stupid at this age), so it’s hard to imagine my dad looking like such an old man when he passed away at only 62 years old.

But he always looked like an old man to me, and I loved him for it. That’s one reason I’ve always respected my elders. You see, my dad was 51 years old when I was born. Already he had salt & pepper hair, and still a full head of it in the casket. That’s how I’ve always seen and remembered him: with this beautiful, wavy salt & pepper hair that I wanted when I grew old. Well, I have it. Mine’s more solid gray, but that’s okay. It still reminds me of Daddy. (I never called him Dad, always Daddy as I was only 10 when he died. So if it sounds silly that I still call him Daddy, well that’s okay…it just sounds right to me.)

I could tell you a lot about this man I loved and admired, and I will. But one thing that is absolutely fascinating is that Andrew J. De Simone was born December 31, 1899. That’s the last day of the century before last! Which meant he was always the same exact age as whatever year it was—to the day. That’s why it’s a little confusing to comprehend he was 51 when I was born in 1951. And he was 62 when he died in 1962. (more…)

#55 Returns & Exchanges

AmperArt-55-Returns-Exchanges

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The day after Christmas must be as dreaded to retailers as the day after Thanksgiving is welcome—you know, Black Friday, the biggest shopping day of the year.

Used to be, before online shopping & big box stores, all the department stores from Sears & Penneys (as it used to be called), to Saks & Nordstroms, had a special window or room all its own (with a classy, discreet sign) that handled returns, exchanges & complaints. Next to that was the gift wrapping service & layaway department.

Remember the smell of fresh popcorn & candy when entering your neighborhood Sears?

Today a couple stores still offer a comfortable setting for such returns & exchanges (no candy or popcorn, though), but the big box & deep discount chains mostly just have a return counter (with a tacky “Line Starts Here” arrow hanging from the ceiling) and a  trail of customers (all “dressed up” in the latest Big Box fashion) that extends out the door.

So December’s AmperArt #55, Returns & Exchanges, repeats the trip to the same brick-&-mortar store (or the online equivalent) that November’s AmperArt #54 portrayed: Stop & Shop (in case you missed it, get trampled here). (more…)