#101 One Hundred & One

One Hundred & One

 #101 One Hundred & One
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Do you see spots?

The idea for AmperArt #101, One Hundred & One, was easier than giving a dog a bone. After struggling with a concept for #100, this one was fun & easy.

One of my fondest childhood memories is sitting in the Alex Theater (Glendale, California) with my family, enjoying this humorous, entertaining, upbeat movie by Disney, One Hundred and One Dalmations. We sure laughed at the antics of ever-hungry Rolly, the chubby dalmation puppy. Even as a youngster, I could tell there was something unique & contemporary about the styling of the animation. It was sketchy in a contemporary fashion due to the first-ever use of scanning the pencil sketches directly onto animation cels with the Xerox process. The color was still brushed in by hand between the lines, but the tedious tracing of the animators’ pencil lines with pen & ink was removed from the process. 

This process could easily have been used as an example for the previous AmperArt #100, Milestones & Goals. But the movie itself is the milestone, so I saved the artwork for #101 One Hundred & One.

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 Incongruent styles.

One Hundred and One Dalmations Movie PosterI was intrigued by the innovative Xerox process & the sketchy style it rendered for this movie. Not only did the revolutionary process create efficiency, it rendered a whole new style of artwork. Researching the lettering for the movie title, I was not so impressed with the colors for the poster. While the movie’s styling of characters & backgrounds was snappy & contemporary, the poster was not. It was all primary colors & a less-than-cohesive assemblage of visual elements. But I did go ahead & trace the lettering (originally hand-drawn) & designed an ampersand to match, for the AmperArt #101 One Hundred & One edition. The edges of the spots & shadows are just slightly blurred, to retain the mostly hard-edge style (due to technical limitations) of the period.

If you wish to study the styling of the dalmations & other characters, this thumbnail will enlarge to a sizeable image.

Image shown for reference & educational purposes only. ©Disney 

Sacrilegious?

Many critics boo-hooed the rough-hewn look of Disney’s One Hundred and One Dalmations. They said the lushness of hand-inked line had vanished. Well, yes, it did. But it was replaced by a snappy new look, akin to jazz vs classical. They each have their place, & they each have their fans & followers. I really like the look of this film, & the new Xerox process made animating all those spots possible. It was the perfect story concept to make use of the innovative imaging tool.

Who is to say animation must be hand-inked & hand-painted? Some of the finest animation today has never been near a brush, pen or even acetate cel & it blows away the crude animation of even the finest early Disney classics. I will admit, though, that I will always prefer to watch the original 1938 Snow White & the Seven Dwarfs to the most incredible CGI remake.

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chaz sez ...

Check out the new “chaz sez” blog at DesimoneDesign.com, my commercial graphic design website. It’s mostly about design, typography, printing, publishing & marketing, but on occasion I’ll divert to a sideways topic that just can’t escape my ranting & raving.


Production notes for #101 One Hundred & One:
Original size: 20×30 inches

Programs: Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop
Lettering: Traced from original movie poster
Ampersand: Designed to match style of original movie poster lettering
Credits:
Movie poster: ©Disney (shown for reference & educational purposes)
You may repost the AmperArt image. Please credit AmperArt.com.
To download a full-size high-resolution 11×17-inch poster, click on the image.

For professional graphic design, please visit Desimone Design.

Desimone? Damn good!

#74 Creak & Quake

AmperArt 74 Creak & Quake


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This is a high-resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

Greetings, mortals.

This morbid installment of my AmperArt series could have been entitled “Crypt Doors & Tombstones” but I chose the just-as-eerie verbs over the nouns “Creak & Quake.” These words are all from the first stanza of Grim Grinning Ghosts, the theme song permeating Walt Disney’s Haunted Mansion. 

Truth be told, I’m still only 99% sure that the song starts with 

“When the crypt doors creak & the tombstones quake…” or
“When the crypt goes creak & the tombstones quake…”

Why? Because after visiting several websites to make sure I got the lyrics right (even though I’ve heard the song hundreds of times, it’s not embedded into the skull like “It’s a Small World”) there were discrepancies. The first site which sounded like an official lyrics site is what threw me off: It read “…goes creak” which was surprising, as I’ve always heard, so I thought, “When the crypt doors creak…” The original songwriters—Buddy Baker, melody, and lyrics by Xavier “X” Atencio, the Disney legend—were listed, along with dates and other information.  So I figured that was what they wrote, and everyone just adapted what they thought they heard. 

Until I visited a few more sites. Everywhere else the song goes “…doors creak…” which sounds so much better; is part of the Disney fans’ venacular; and what I chose to use in my piece of artwork. (It’s probably the correct choice.)

William Shakespeare & his poem, Venus & Adonis, influenced the title of the Haunted Mansion’s theme song:

Look, how the world’s poor people are amaz’d
At apparitions, signs, and prodigies,
Whereon with fearful eyes they long have gaz’d,
Infusing them with dreadful prophecies;

So she at these sad sighs draws up her breath,
And, sighing it again, exclaims on Death.
‘Hard-favour’d tyrant, ugly, meagre, lean,
Hateful divorce of love,’—thus chides she Death,—
Grim-grinning ghost, earth’s worm, what dost thou mean
To stifle beauty and to steal his breath,

Who when he liv’d, his breath and beauty set
Gloss on the rose, smell to the violet?

The tombstone and graveyard in this piece really do exist: The Granary Cemetery, Boston, Mass. Well, almost. The top and borders of the tombstone are authentic (except for the iconic “D” under the skull); I elongated the entire monument and replaced the somber inscription with silly lyrics. So much for reverence. I wish to give credit to an incredible photographer, whose image I came across on the Internet and used as reference for this piece. Her name is Della Huff. Her photography is spectacular. See it at http://dellahuffphoto.zenfolio.com/ I had no idea such morbid tombstones actually existed. The graveyard, though heavily distorted by my twisted mind, is among many wonderful photographs I found at https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbdezines/sets/72157607857008082/


listen up!

As much as I detest innacuracy (why can’t others do a little research like I did, even though it took longer than the artwork?) it led me to several interesting haunts:

I discovered alternate, highly entertaining versions of Grim Grinning Ghosts; a great video for the kids (and the grown-up kids); and of course it was hauntingly wonderful to hear the original soundtrack again (where I could swear they enunciate “doors”). Here are those sites:

Turn off the lights and turn up the sound:

Entertaining a capella from VoicePlay:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpw0yQpvb_c

Here’s the original soundtrack followed by a cool alternate version (which seems to have been produced by James Presley) and some of the beginning and ending narrative:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSaqSVi–Ms

The kids will enjoy this singalong video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eavo08IXduQ (I like it very much myself.)

And something really entertaining — spooky at first with organ and choir, then wildly zany with unique voices, and all sorts of other sounds…produced by James Presley:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI_4vzqevLg


Production notes:
Original size: 10×15 inches
Program: Photoshop, Illustrator (for the dingbats)
Fonts: Willow, Eccentric, Harrington
Ampersand: Harrington (line shadow added)
Images:
Tombstone & graveyard  reference: Granary Cemetery, Boston, Massachussetts, USA

Della Huff is the photographer whose tombstone photo was used for reference and sampling by the artist. See her spectacular fine art photography at http://dellahuffphoto.zenfolio.com/  Della’s original photo that made this AmperArt piece possible:
http://www.pbase.com/dellybean/image/40946116
Graveyard background: mbdezines Image modified so extensively it does not resemble the original photograph…but the background would  not be “authentic” without this photographer’s contribution.
Artist discovered that crypts do have doors at:
http://idiotphotographer.wordpress.com/2014/05/28/the-crypt-doors-of-ricoleta/
Music and lyrics sites visited for reference:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpw0yQpvb_c
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSaqSVi–Ms
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eavo08IXduQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RI_4vzqevLg

H u r r y  b a c k . . .

#10 Crazy & Different

AmperArt #10 Crazy & Different


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This is a high-resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

Upon reading of Steve Jobs’ passing, I felt almost the same way as I did on December 15, 1966…

As I was folding papers for my paper route, the headline caught my eye:

WALT DISNEY DIES

I went numb and cried. Both Disney and Jobs were visionaries, creative geniuses, demanding perfectionists, and they both died much too young.

My first laptop was the very first Titanium G3–it couldn’t even burn a cd, it was such an early model. (I’ve since learned to wait for version 2 or 3.) I was so proud of that thing. It was the ultimate in stylish design. I didn’t even care if there was a computer inside the case, it was just beautiful to look at. That’s what I appreciate most about Steve–he made everything with class, from the way it works to the way it looks and feels, even down to the marketing and advertising.

Macskateer

M-I-C… See how insanely great this world is today.

K-E-Y…Why? Because of visionary genius.

After Walt passed away the company stumbled for awhile, but the “cast members” and fans of Disney have so much soul that they got it back on its feet. We’ll always wonder what else Walt would have created had he lived longer, and surely we wonder that about Steve. But just like Disney, Apple has such a strong desire to be a class act and produce class products, supported by its incredibly loyal fans, that Steve would probably be proud of what his people continue to invent and polish.

I designed this poster honoring Steve Jobs, as a special edition in my AmperArt poster series.

The words are straight from of one of Steve’s speeches.

No doubt Walt and Steve are thinking up the next insanely great idea in visionary heaven.


Production notes:
Original size: 20 x 30 inches
Program: Photoshop (coulda used Illustrator—probably started out as an entirely different concept for which Photoshop would be required)
Font: Myriad (Apple’s marketing font family)
Ampersand: Myriad, sans one delicious byte