#65 Black & Blue

65-black-blue


Click to view full-size or download hi-rez image for gallery-quality printing and framing.
This is a high-resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

My favorite colors are black &¬†“charlie blue.”

Black is actually my very favorite color &¬†yes, it is a color. (See “chaz sez” below.) “Charlie blue,” as my friends know it, is anything between Crayola Blue Green to cerulean to turquoise to cyan (one of the four printing ink colors). AmperArt #65, Black & Blue, features CBG as I call it, cyan, and one other blue which I’ll get to later. All my favorite blues are somewhere in-between CBG and cyan.

I am not fond of sky blue, navy,¬†baby blue¬†nor royal blue. They are cold. (Yes, I know, my very favorite color‚ÄĒblack‚ÄĒis definitely freezing. But we’re talking blue here.)

There is a very deep blue that does tingle my color bone. That’s cobalt blue. My first memory of that color is my father’s blue cuff links. Also the knob on his steering wheel to help turn¬†the tires¬†before power steering (that accessory became¬†illegal because when the steering wheel snapped back the knob could remove a finger or two). &¬†the cool red¬†tail lights with the blue¬†dot in the middle, which created a magical color effect. ¬†They’re popular again today but I remember the originals on my dad’s 1950-something automobile. Probably no other recollection of cobalt blue is stronger for me than the bottle of Vicks VapoRub. That stuff felt¬†ice-cold as the color of the bottle it was packaged in. I’m also partial to cobalt blue because it is the favorite color of my mother and my brother Rob. So that is the other blue¬†in this AmperArt piece.

Vicks-jar-with-lid-circle

Just looking at this Vicks jar opens my sinuses! Other¬†products¬†in¬†cobalt blue bottles were Noxzema, Phillips Milk of Magnesia (sounds appetizing, doesn’t it?), Bromo Seltzer, Nivea and Blue Coral.

In fairness to navy, royal blue, sky blue & all those that are not my favorites, combine them with various other colors & they create outstanding color schemes. Of course, the same could be said for poop brown.

I am releasing #65 Black & Blue during the playful days of¬†summer, because that’s when I recall we’d get the most bruised up falling off our bikes, skateboards, or just playing in the backyard. I did, anyway. I was a real klutz. Still can’t ride a skateboard.


listen up! Black is a color! Not the absence of color, nor the combination of all colors. It is color. So is white. So why do people say it’s all the colors or no¬†color? Because they don’t know the definition of color. “Color” means the description of the hue, value &¬†tone.¬†Pure yellow is a color that has a hue somewhere between orange¬†& green on the color wheel, a very light value (high-key, or very bright compared to very dark such as navy blue), &¬†minimal¬†tone (grayishness; mauve &¬†sage green have medium¬†tone).

The color black is defined by no hue (red, yellow, blue, etc.), the darkest value, & zero tone. White is defined by no hue, the lightest value, & zero tone. So you see, black & white have no hue & no tone, but they are both colors.

If you want to have some fun with all the other colors, check out the Crayola website, especially the¬†history¬†&¬†the Crayola Experience where kids (including big kids) get to play &¬†create among all things Crayola, & see how they are made. If you can’t make it to the factory in Easton, Pennsylvania, watch this video: How Crayolas Are Made.

I love Crayolas. (I won’t use any other brand; the colors aren’t as pure, they’re waxy & they just aren’t Crayola.) I remember when the box of 64 premiered, with the awesome¬†Built-In Sharpener. I probably have the few stubs that are left of my original set somewhere, but today I have The Ultimate Crayola Collection‚ÄĒ152 different colors!‚ÄĒon my desk. I use them frequently, &¬†always to sign important legal documents. For that task, of course, it’s Crayola Blue Green.


PRODUCTION NOTES:
Original size: 20√ó30 inches
Program: Illustrator
Lettering: Hand-lettered by Chaz DeSimone
Colors: Cyan, cobalt blue, Crayola Blue Green & black
CREDITS:
Vicks ad: flickr.com/photos/28153783@N08/ “SaltyCotton” has nearly 2000 photos of vintage ads in pristine condition. An ad designer’s or collector’s eye candy overload!
Vicks jar: Joe Corr on pinterest.com/pin/274930752225672732/ and etsy.com/shop/owlsongvintage Beautiful collectibles and antiques.
 

#48 Cool & Comfortable

AmperArt #48 Cool & Comfortable


Click to view full size  without watermark & download hi-rez image for gallery-quality printing & framing.
This is a high-resolution pdf & may take a few minutes to download.
Find printing tips & framing ideas here.

UPDATE SEPT. 2017:

Now this is cool!

Just today I got a new AmperArt subscriber whose business is called Ampersand Heating & Cooling in Bridgewater, Virginia. How Bart named his business name “Ampersand is quite interesting. Seems like a fun & friendly guy, too. If he wasn’t on the other end of the continent I’d hire him to keep my place cool & comfortable.


“Cool & Comfortable” was a popular advertising slogan before mid-century, as far back as the 1920s, & then again after mid-century,  right up through the Disco Era.

Early on, it was used to draw crowds to air-conditioned movie palaces & businesses — “It’s cool inside!” — which were often colder than the local storage plant.

A few decades later the fashion world (if you can call polyester jump suits fashion) claimed its revolutionary new man-made fabrics were Cool & Comfortable. & sexy.

Enjoy some old ads for “modern air control” and “mod fashion”…

This 1953 The Saturday Evening Post photo features both synthetic air & synthetic fabrics. The caption says “Baby, it’s cool inside! A singed sun bather is invited to beat the heat inside an air-cooled Las Vegas, Nev., hotel. Next: air-conditioned streets.” Looks more like he’s saying “You want heat, you got heat. Don’t open that door & let the cold air out!”

1953-newsp-ad-air-cond500

You might enjoy these entire pages from that edition which contain wonderful old ads & some interesting facts about the evolution of a/c on The Saturday Evening Post’s website.

Decades later, this ad promises instant love & romance just by slipping on this one-piece wonder:

polyesterMore great fashion of the era, posted by Steve Hauben of the Data + Design Project:: Cool & Comfortable (& Sexy) Polyester

Choose one: Does my latest background image remind you of a sexy fashion textile or a sexy air conditioner filter? Either way, stay Cool & Comfortable this summer.


 

PRODUCTION NOTES:
Original dimensions: 20″ x 30″
Programs: Illustrator, Photoshop
Fonts: Teen (a font which is very similar to a loose, contemporary hand-lettering style of the era), Amienne (ampersand)
Ampersand: Amienne (tilted)
Background: pattern from SquidFingers.com (lots of free patterns); posted by 1stwebdesigner.com (22 free seamless pattern sources)
CREDITS:
Air conditioning photo: Gene Lester, The Saturday Evening Post, June 6, 1953.
Clothing ad: Visual News; posted by Steve Hauben

 

chazsezLOGO-85x64

It’s been Cool & Comfortable in Southern California the past couple weeks (I like the heat, so anything below 100 degrees Fahrenheit is fine by me), but two weeks ago it was so hot I blew three circuit breakers till I found the outlet that could handle the air conditioner in my studio. Even when I’m not around I want my cats to be Cool & Comfortable.

I hope you are enjoying your summer. Thanks for subscribing to AmperArt. Please invite your ampersand-fan friends & colleagues to subscribe–tell them it’s fabulous & free.